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Tornado Drill Reminder… What Would You Do If You Were In a Real Tornado?

Posted at 9 a.m.

Tornado Drill March 2017

Virginia’s Statewide Tornado Drill is this morning, Tuesday, March 21, at 9:45 a.m.

The annual drill is an opportunity to take a moment and think about what you would do during a real tornado — and actually practice those actions.

Do you know what you should do?

If you are in a structure such as your residence, a small building, school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center or high-rise building:

  • Go to a pre-designated area such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar or the lowest building level. If there is no basement, go to the center of a small interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors and outside walls. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. Get under a sturdy table and use your arms to protect your head and neck.
  • In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
  • Put on sturdy shoes.
  • Do not open windows.

If you are in a manufactured home or office:

  • Get out immediately and go to a pre-identified location such as the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or a storm shelter. Mobile homes, even if tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes.

If you are not in a sturdy building, possible actions include:

  • Immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter. If your vehicle is hit by flying debris while you are driving, pull over and park.
  • Take cover in a stationary vehicle. Put the seat belt on and cover your head with your arms and a blanket, coat or other cushion if possible.
  • Lie in an area noticeably lower than the level of the roadway and cover your head with your arms and a blanket, coat or other cushion if possible.
  • In all situations, however:
    • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location.
    • Never try to outrun a tornado in urban or congested areas in a car or truck. Instead, leave the vehicle immediately for safe shelter.
    • Watch out for flying debris. Flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries.

Learn more about tornadoes and tornado safety from Ready.gov.

Be sure to participate in this morning’s drill — and please register your participation.

After the drill is complete, be sure to register for Fairfax Alerts emergency notifications to your smartphone and email inbox. You can select specialized categories of alerts — be sure to sign up for severe weather alerts!

Fairfax Alerts

Register Now for Statewide Tornado Drill on March 21

Posted at 1:30 p.m.

On Feb. 24, 2016, Virginia was hit by the deadliest tornado event since 1959, resulting in five fatalities and more than 45 injuries. An EF-1 tornado touched down on the Town of Waverly in Sussex County, an EF-3 tornado affected Appomattox County, and another EF-3 tornado hit the Middle Peninsula and Northern Neck region.

The National Weather Service (NWS) verified that eight tornadoes struck Virginia during that storm. These storms are a stark reminder that Virginians must prepare for the possibility of tornadoes and other natural disasters.

Tornado Drill March 2017

Virginia’s annual Statewide Tornado Drill will take place Tuesday, March 21, at 9:45 a.m.

The drill will start with a test tornado warning sent by the National Weather Service to National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather radios. NOAA weather radios will sound a tone alert and show a test message (or flash to indicate a message) to simulate what people would hear or see during an actual tornado warning. Local radio stations, TV stations and cable outlets will broadcast the test message via the Emergency Alert System.

The Statewide Tornado Drill is a yearly opportunity to prepare Virginians for tornado emergencies and to test public warning systems.

“Tornadoes can occur any month of the year, and Virginia averages 16 tornadoes each year,” said Bill Sammler of the National Weather Service. “When a tornado watch is issued for your area, know where to seek safe shelter should a tornado warning be issued.”

Show your support by registering for the tornado drill. In recent years, 1 million Virginians have signed up.

Register for the 2017 Tornado Drill

REGISTER HERE

For more information about how to keep yourself, your loved ones and property safe during tornadoes, visit www.vaemergency.gov/prepare-recover/threat/tornadoes.

* If widespread severe weather threatens the commonwealth on that date, then the drill will be rescheduled for Wednesday, March 22, at 9:45 a.m.

Get Ready … Tornado Drill Starts at 9:45 a.m.

Posted at 8:45 a.m.

tornado preparednessThis year’s statewide tornado drill begins at 9:45 a.m. Hopefully you are ready to take part.

The tornado drill is an important safety exercise to prepare for nature’s most violent storms. Our state has been hit hard in the past by multiple tornadoes, including several just last month, which have cost lives and left extensive damage.

Fairfax AlertsThe drill will start with a message from the National Weather Service. Our Fairfax Alerts will also send a message. If you’re not yet registered for Fairfax Alerts, do so here: www.fairfaxcounty.gov/alerts.

What to Do During the Drill?

What should you do for the drill? Exactly what you would do if a tornado warning was issued for your area:

  • When a warning is issued, immediately take cover.
  • Move to a designated shelter such as a basement or windowless room.
  • Get under a sturdy table and use your arms to protect head and neck — crouch as low as possible to the floor, face down and cover your head with your hands.
  • If outdoors with no shelter, lie flat in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands. Do not get under an overpass or bridge.
  • Get out of vehicles and go to the closest shelter.
  • Do not try to outrun a tornado in an urban or congested area.

Practicing these steps at least once a year will help you be better prepared when a tornado occurs near you. Because as you know, there isn’t a season for tornadoes — they can happen anywhere at any time!

Learn more online about tornado safety. You can also contact our emergency management office at 571-350-1000, TTY 711, or email oem@fairfaxcounty.gov.

And thanks in advance for taking part in today’s tornado drill.

It’s Not Too Late to Register for the Statewide Tornado Drill

Posted at 11 a.m.

The Feb. 24 severe storm system that spawned eight tornadoes, caused five deaths and inflicted damage to more than 400 structures is a stark reminder that tornadoes do occur in Virginia.

Since tornadoes can happen anywhere at any time, the Virginia Department of Emergency Management and the National Weather Service hold a yearly tornado drill, which is fast approaching — Tuesday, March 22, at 9:45 a.m. The drill is aimed to make everyone familiar with what to do in case a tornado were to strike your neighborhood or office building.

In this video, Sandi Fox of our emergency management office explains why you should be a part of this year’s drill.

Learn more about the drill and register to participate at www.vaemergency.gov/readyvirginia/stayinformed/tornadoes, however, registration is not necessary to participate.

Are You Registered for the March 22 Statewide Tornado Drill?

Posted at 1:30 p.m.

Just last month (Feb. 24), four people were killed in Virginia during the state’s first deadly February twisters on record.

Did you know that registration for Virginia’s statewide tornado drill — Tuesday, March 22, at 9:45 a.m. — is now open. Have you registered yet?

Tornado Drill 2016

Tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms. They can appear suddenly without warning and can be invisible until dust and debris are picked up or a funnel cloud appears. Be prepared to act quickly.

  • There were 67 tornadoes in Virginia from 2011 to 2013.
  • 12 tornadoes occurred in Virginia in 2014.
  • Seven tornadoes were recorded in Virginia in 2015.

When it comes to tornadoes, there’s no such thing as a “tornado season.” Tornadoes can strike anywhere, anytime — and you need to know the drill. That’s the reason the March 22 tornado drill is so important.

Sign up today as an individual, or register your family’s participation, your school or your business.