Archive by Author | Fairfax County Emergency Information

2017 Hurricane Preparedness Week Underway

Posted at 11 a.m.

This week (May 7-13) is National Hurricane Preparedness Week.

Hurricanes are one of nature’s most powerful and destructive events and the cause behind eight of the 10 costliest disasters in U.S. history. Hurricanes are not just a coastal concern. High winds, heavy rainfall, tornadoes and flooding can be felt hundreds of miles inland, potentially causing loss of life and catastrophic damage to property.

Hurricane season begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30. Now is the time to prepare.

  • Make a family emergency communication plan.
  • Be sure to include your pets in your emergency preparedness planning.
  • Identify an out of town emergency contact to coordinate information with family and friends.
  • Keep an emergency kit where you spend time — home, car and work.
  • Practice your preparedness plans with a drill or exercise.

 

Visit www.ready.gov/hurricanes for more information about hurricane preparedness. For the current National Hurricane Center map of active Atlantic cyclones and tropical disturbances, visit www.nhc.noaa.gov/cyclones/?atlc.

Flood Warning Issued for Fairfax City and Central Fairfax County

Posted at 9:10 a.m.

Flood Warning

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a Flood Warning for the City of Fairfax and Central Fairfax County until 12:30 p.m.

NWS reports some locations that will experience flooding include Reston, Annandale, Springfield, Fairfax, Vienna, Falls Church, Mantua, Pimmit Hills, Woodbridge, Lake Ridge, Burke, Oakton, Tysons Corner, Montclair, Lorton, Wolf Trap and Great Falls.

Remember… turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood deaths occur in vehicles.

Get more details on the weather forecast.

Take Time to Prepare During National Small Business Week

Posted at 11:30 a.m.

Small Business Week 2017

National Small Business Week (April 30-May 6) is underway. The U.S. Small Business Administration uses this week to highlight the impact of outstanding entrepreneurs, small business owners and others from across the nation.

This week is also an opportunity for small businesses to prepare for emergencies. Businesses that take steps now to be prepared help ensure business continuity, employee preparedness and help enhance relationships throughout their community before disasters strike.

More than half of Americans either own or work for a small business and they create about two out of every three new jobs in the United States each year. Small businesses also play a critical role in a community’s recovery following a disaster.

It is important to prepare your organization now for a variety of emergencies like fires, flood, cyber threats, and other disasters.

Start by developing an all hazards preparedness plan that identifies all potential hazards, addresses vulnerabilities, and identifies time sensitive or critical processes and the financial and operational impacts that can result from disruption of those business processes.

Employers and business owners should consider business interruption insurance that can help cover the loss of income after a disaster, which is different than property insurance that only covers physical damage to a facility or location.

Ready Business can assist businesses in developing a preparedness program by providing tools to create a plan that addresses the impact of many hazards. For more information, visit www.ready.gov/business.

You can also use Make a Plan at www.ReadyNOVA.org
the business preparedness planner from ReadyNOVA.org.

 

Regional Full-Scale Exercise Focuses on Preparing for Complex Terror Attack

Posted at 1:30 p.m.

Law enforcement officials and other first responders from several National Capital Region jurisdictions will participate in a full-scale exercise tomorrow, Wednesday, April 26, designed to prepare for the possibility of a complex coordinated terror attack in the region.

The life-like exercise will occur between 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. and will include actors posing as casualties. The regional exercise will be staged at six sites in the District of Columbia, suburban Maryland and Northern Virginia, and will involve hundreds of police, fire and emergency medical service personnel and volunteer actors.

The locations include neighborhoods in Fairfax, Prince George’s and Arlington Counties, as well as the Northeast and Southeast quadrants of the District of Columbia. Fairfax County’s exercise site is the former Lorton Reformatory prison site.

There is no reason for alarm if you observe increased public safety personnel in the area of any of the exercise activity.

“We’ll stage a very realistic emergency event involving multiple sites and actors posing as the casualties,” said Scott Boggs, managing director of Homeland Security and Public Safety at the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG). “However, there is no reason for residents to be alarmed because the exercise will occur in a controlled environment.”

Emergency managers who work together at COG planned the exercise to help protect residents by preparing for an attack involving multiple target locations and teams of perpetrators.

It’s National Public Safety Telecommunicator’s Week

Posted at 11:50 a.m.

National Public Safety Telecommunicator’s Week, created in 1981, is celebrated every year during the second full week of April. This year it’s April 9-15.

In this video, Bill Kang, director of the county’s Department of Public Safety Communications — the 9-1-1 Center — explains what this week is about and what telecommunicators at the 9-1-1 Center do.

The Fairfax County 9-1-1 Center is holding several events this week, including the 12th annual DPSC Awards Ceremony on Tuesday, April 11, at 6:30 p.m. at the McConnell Public Safety and Transportation Operations Center (MPSTOC), 4890 Alliance Drive, Fairfax.

Years of service awards and staff promotions will be presented, along with other honors such as the Excellence in Call Taking award, Rookie of the Year award, Meritorious Action, Fairfax County 9-1-1Director’s Commendations and more.

Hopefully you’ll never need to call or text 9-1-1, but if you should, they are there to assist you 24 hours-a-day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.