Derecho: One Year Later

Posted 4:13 p.m.

This happened one year ago:

Overnight June 29, 2012, into the early morning hours of Saturday, June 30, Fairfax County and the National Capital Region learned first-hand what a Derecho storm could do to our community.

Just after midnight in Fairfax County, there were thousands without power, hundreds of trees down, roads were closed, the county’s 9-1-1 center was affected by a power loss at a Verizon facility and a state of emergency was declared for Virginia and Fairfax County.

tree damage from derechoNot only did the storm cause havoc when it hit, but many suffered through extreme heat without electricity for several days.

As we reflect on our experiences from that time, it’s also a good reminder that we need to be prepared at all times for any type of emergency or weather event.

Fairfax County Preparation

Since the Derecho, the county has taken numerous steps. Our Board of Supervisors has been involved collectively as well as individually in their districts promoting emergency preparedness.  Our emergency management office created an online disaster damage database to allow county residents to report damage caused by emergencies like the derecho, as well as hurricanes, tropical storms, earthquakes, fires, snow or other disasters.

Through a survey of residents and businesses, the county has improved our communications outreach. And our 9-1-1 and public safety officials submitted official comments to the Federal Communications Commission’s Derecho report and were involved with regional work on the issue with the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.

Listen as Board of Supervisors Chairman Sharon Bulova discusses progress with Verizon since last year:

What You Told Us

After the storm last year, we conducted a survey about communications. Nearly 6,000 respondents answered questions and generated nearly 18,000 individual comments, which provided us with some great insight for future emergencies. Here’s a snapshot of the results:

Derecho storm survey infographic

What You Can Do to Prepare

As we enter the summer season, which can bring extreme heat and severe thunderstorms, here’s a four step plan of action to take to prepare for the next weather event:

  1. Buy flashlights and extra batteries this weekend so you’re ready if you lose power. You may also want to consider purchasing a generator in case you lose electricity for extended periods.
  2. Sign up for emergency alerts, including severe weather alerts, that can be delivered to you by email and text.
  3. Become digitally prepared. As the survey shows above, many of you will be dependent on your mobile device for information, so download our app and follow our digital tips.
  4. Put together a plan. “Planning” often times doesn’t seem important or perhaps you think it’s too hard to do. Start with the Ready NOVA Emergency Preparedness Planner, a free, online tool that makes it easy to put together an emergency plan for your family.
    • Be sure to include plans for the most vulnerable in your family or neighborhood. If there are access or functional needs, register with us so we can contact you directly after an incident.
    • And don’t forget plans for your pets. Try to think of places they can go, supplies they need and more. Pets are such an important part of many of our lives, but they need plans, too.

Planning and preparing doesn’t have to be hard or time consuming or expensive. As you’re enjoying your weekend and the upcoming July 4th holiday, take a conscientious effort and set aside time to follow these four ideas and more.

Whatever it takes… make the time and take the steps to ensure that you and your loved ones are safe when the next emergency strikes our community.

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3 responses to “Derecho: One Year Later”

  1. looncall44@yahoo.com says :

    Bad timing for the history lesson. Great way to confuse people.

    J. R. McBrien

    • Fairfax County Emergency Information says :

      J.R.: Thanks for the comment. This post was ready to go earlier this afternoon, but we waited until the bulk of the strong storms passed through to share. Today’s storms serve as a reminder that we all need to be prepared even though they were nothing like what happened one year ago.

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