Video: Hurricane Preparedness

Posted at 4:15 p.m.

Hurricane season began on Saturday, June 1, and according to the NOAA Climate Prediction Center, this is expected to be an active Atlantic Hurricane season. We were affected by Hurricane Sandy last year and a slight turn westward would have impacted us more. We all need to be ready.

Our Office of Emergency Management encourages residents to take some simple steps now to ensure that you and your family are prepared in case of hurricanes or other severe weather.

 

Hurricane Preparedness Tips

Hurricane Sandy as seen from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on October 28, 2012. Photo Credit: NOAA/NASA

Hurricane Sandy as seen from NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite on October 28, 2012. Photo Credit: NOAA/NASA

Among the steps you should take now:

  • Assemble an emergency supply kit. If you already have one, check it to make sure all supplies are accounted for and re-stock items as necessary.
  • Cut dead trees and limbs that could fall on your home.
  • Learn the difference between a watch and a warning. 
    • A hurricane watch means that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within the specified area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
    • A hurricane warning means that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
  • If your home or business is in a flood-prone area, make sure you have a current flood insurance policy (not typically part of a standard insurance policy). A 30-day waiting period is generally required to purchase flood insurance, so take time now to visit your insurance agent to learn more.
  • Take pictures of your property before the storm to help validate your claim and remember to take your policies with you if you need to evacuate.

Learn more from our preparedness Web page as well as Ready.gov. For easy access to hurricane information on your phone, download the free Hurricane App from the American Red Cross (iPhone and Android). It will help you track storms, prepare your family and home, get help, and more.

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3 responses to “Video: Hurricane Preparedness”

  1. Bobbie says :

    What should be in an emergency kit? If you have no lower level, what is the safest place in your home?

  2. Bobbie says :

    What should be in an emergency kit? If you have no lower level, what is the safest place in your home?

    • fairfaxcounty says :

      Bobbie,
      The most important items are the basics, such as non-perishable food, water, flashlights with extra batteries, first-aid kit and extra medications. Other options include moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation; toys and games for young children; a wrench or pliers to turn off utilities; and a whistle to signal for help. More details can be found on our Prepare Web Page, as well as this Ready.gov checklist.

      If you don’t have a lower level in your home, seek shelter in a small interior room, closet or hallway on the lowest level. Stay away from windows and glass doors and lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.

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