It’s National Severe Weather Preparedness Week

National Severe Weather Preparedness Week poster“Know your risk, take action, and be a force of nature” by taking proactive preparedness measures and inspiring others to do the same during National Severe Weather Preparedness Week.

Last April, tornadoes raked the central and southern United States, spawning more than 300 tornadoes and claiming hundreds of lives. That devastating, historic outbreak was only one of many weather-related tragedies in 2011, which now holds the record for the greatest number of multi-billion dollar weather disasters in the nation’s history.

The country has already experienced early and destructive tornado outbreaks in the Midwest and South this year over the last two months, including a significant number of tornadoes last weekend. May is the peak season for tornadoes, so it is important to take action now.

You also may remember the fake tornadoes that struck Fairfax County in March. Or the real floods that affected us last September.

“One of the lessons we can take away from the recent tornado outbreaks is that severe weather (of any kind) can happen anytime, anywhere,” said Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate. “While we can’t control where or when it might hit, we can take steps in advance to prepare and that’s why we are asking people to pledge to prepare, and share with others so they will do the same.”

To “be a force of nature,” FEMA, NOAA and Fairfax County encourage you to prepare for extreme weather by following these guidelines:

Know your risk:

  • The first step to becoming weather-ready is to understand the type of hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could impact you and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly and sign up for alerts. Severe weather comes in many forms and your shelter plan should include all types of local hazards.

Take action:

  • Develop an emergency plan based on our local weather hazards and practice how and where to take shelter. Create or refresh an emergency kit for needed food, supplies and medication. Post your plan where visitors can see it. Learn what you can do to strengthen your home or business against severe weather. Obtain a NOAA Weather Radio. Download FEMA’s mobile app so you can access important safety tips on what to do before and during severe weather. Understand the weather warning system and become a certified storm spotter through the National Weather Service.

Be a force of nature:

  • Once you have taken action, tell your family, friends, school staff and co-workers about how they can prepare. Share the resources and alert systems you discovered with your social media network. Studies show individuals need to receive messages a number of ways before acting – and you can be one of those sources. When you go to shelter during a warning, send a text, tweet or post a status update so your friends and family know. You might just save their lives, too. For more information on how you can participate, visit www.ready.gov/severeweather.

About Fairfax Gov

Official emergency information about preparedness, response and recovery from Fairfax County Government.

One response to “It’s National Severe Weather Preparedness Week”

  1. Laniys says :

    The website shown on the poster does not work. This one works better: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com/weatherreadynation/news/042212_severe.html

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